Saturday, May 31, 2014

MomoCon and Fans!




Last week I attended MomoCon for the first time, and I had a blast. Though I've attended DragonCon in 2012 and 2013, I enjoyed this con because it is smaller and less overwhelming. If you haven't been to a convention, they're big events where celebrities attend as well as hundreds of fans. There are many artists who sell awesome art work to sell, tons of people dress up in costume of their favorite characters, and panels by fans or with celebrities.

I went to two panels where several actors from my favorite shows attended and they were just the best. Afterward I had the awesome opportunity to meet them and get autographs. ^ ^

Dante Basco 
(Rufio in Hook, Zuko in Avatar: The Last Airbender, and Jake Long in American Dragon: Jake Long)

Bryce Papenbrook 
(Eren Yeagar in Attack on Titan, Ryn in Blue Exorcist, and Kirito in Sword Art Online)

Cherami Leigh 
(Asuna in Sword Art Online, Elizabeth in Black Butler, and Lucy in Fairy Tail

They were all so kind to all of their fans and really down to earth. And it made me think about being a future author with fans. I haven't been published yet, and I've acquired a few. I love you guys! But I think as writers and future authors we could learn a few things from these people about handling fans in person.

1.) Give them Your Attention - One awesome thing about theses actors was when you spoke to them they looked you in the eye. They made you feel important by stopping and paying attention to you. Make your fans feel important.

2.) Be Humble - Actors/Writers/Whatever famous people or published authors are just people
Kakashi from Naruto. ^ ^
too. These actors felt so at our level. They didn't act high and mighty and above us. Don't let being published or having a ton of views on your blog puff up your pride. We're all people, and it's so refreshing to know that that actors/writers/etc. are just regular people like us.

3.) Fan Their Fangirling - If they drew something for you, take a minute to look at it. If they dressed up as your character, compliment them on it. They did it because they love you and your work. Encourage them. Dante Basco said my Katara costume was awesome, and that totally made my day.

4.) Say Their Name - When you get an autograph from a celebrity they'll address it to you unless you tell them otherwise. These actors said "Thank you, Victoria" after every signing, and it made me feel like an individual and not just another fan. And telling them thank you acknowledges that you respect that they came all this way to see you and waited time in line or whatever obstacles just to meet you.

5.) Signature - Work on a cool signature. I need to do this, but having a cool signature and then writing a quote is pretty awesome. Penning down a default quote or asking the fan a quote both work. Dante Basco asked me what my favorite line was of Zuko's and wrote it for me. ^ ^ It was "That's rough, buddy." ;)

It is awesome to have fans and to be a fan. It's pretty humbling and encouraging to have someone you've never met admire you and want to do something for you. And it feels great to meet an author or actor or known person you like. I've had some fans draw some fan art for me and even cosplay as one of my characters. Receiving emails and reading comments from fans makes my day.

Thank you to all my fans who read my blog and are following me on my other social media sites. ^ ^ You guys are awesome! Give a fan a hug today. ^ ^

If you'd like to see more pics from MomoCon 2014 check out my Convention Facebook album.

Has a fan ever done something awesome for you? Have you ever done something awesome for an actor/celebrity/etc. or had a great experience with them? I'd love to hear about it in the comments. ^^
If you liked this post, come back every Saturday for more writing advice, character interviews, book reviews and more! On Sundays I have Soundtrack Sundays where I post a new score piece, Tuesdays are Tea Tuesdays with tea reviews, Wednesdays I have Wonderful Word Wednesdays where I post a new vocabulary word, and Fridays are Fan Fridays where I post tags and other goodies. To help support my dream to be an author follow this blog, like me on Facebook, watch me on deviantART, and follow me on Pinterest and Twitter. If you want to know more about my books check out them out here. Thank you! :)


Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Mawkish




It's Wonderful Word Wednesday again, and I have an old favorite here. :)
.
mawkish
adjective
1.) characterized by sickly sentimentality; weakly emotional; maudlin.
2.) having a mildly sickening flavor; slightly nauseating.

Example Sentence: A mawkish scent drifted from the yellow blossoms growing on the black bark trees.


Have you seen or used this word before? What do you think of it?

If you liked this post, come back every Saturday for more writing advice, character interviews, book reviews and more! On Sundays I have Soundtrack Sundays where I post a new score piece, Tuesdays are Tea Tuesdays with tea reviews, Wednesdays I have Wonderful Word Wednesdays where I post a new vocabulary word, and Fridays are Fan Fridays where I post tags and other goodies. To help support my dream to be an author follow this blog, like me on Facebook, watch me on deviantART, and follow me on Pinterest and Twitter. If you want to know more about my books check out them out here. Thank you! :)



Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Tea Tuesday: Cactus Juice




I'm not really a coffee person. I prefer tea, and I know a lot of fellow writers love tea, too. But have you ever wanted to break out of the Early Grey or English Breakfast norm and try something new? Well, let me help you find some cool new teas! If you need a little hot and flavorful boost to help you reach your writing goal or you're just a lover of tea or you'd like to try some tea but aren't fond of the stereotypical types, these Tea Tuesday posts are for you.

This weeks tea is ... 

*drum roll*

Cactus Juice


How I found it: One night, I was minding my own business and procrastinating on Facebook when I noticed an ad about Avatar: The Last Airbender teas. Feeling curious, I clicked the link and my mouth dropped open. This site had a whole set of teas of different avatar characters and even more fandom inspired teas! But I particularly wanted this set so after convincing myself that this would be an early birthday gift to me I got it. XD I got this tea in the same set as a KataraAang, Iroh, and Toph tea. ^ ^

The Tea: This is a light, herbal tea with dominant flavors of cucumber and apples. It's refreshing and definitely the quenchiest, but I can assure you it won't make you start seeing circle birds, giant mushrooms, and people on fire. This tea is pink as opposed the milky green of actual cactus juice, but it is still the flavor I'd think it would taste like. I wonder if this is what the cactus juice in the show would taste like and if Sokka would dare try this tea.


Serving Recommendations: I brewed this tea for four minutes and added sugar.

How much is it and where can you get it? You can find this tea at the Adagio website. I bought this tea in a sample set which was about $22 including shipping and you get a goodly amount of tea since you only need about a teaspoon per cup.

So how good is it? Though this wasn't my favorite tea ever, I enjoyed this tea very much. It really made me think of the episode "The Desert" lol. Four stars!


Have you tried this tea? What did you think of it? Have you seen Avatar: The Last Airbender? Who's your favorite character?

Bonus! If you are a first-time Adagio customer I can send you a $5 giftcard! Ask in the comments for details! (This is no joke and no catch I seriously can. It's part of the amazingness of Adagio Teas)

If you liked this post, come back every Saturday for more writing advice, character interviews, book reviews and more! On Sundays I have Soundtrack Sundays where I post a new score piece, Tuesdays are Tea Tuesdays with tea reviews, Wednesdays I have Wonderful Word Wednesdays where I post a new vocabulary word, and Fridays are Fan Fridays where I post tags and other goodies. To help support my dream to be an author follow this blog, like me on Facebook, watch me on deviantART, and follow me on Pinterest and Twitter. If you want to know more about my books check out them out here. Thank you! :)


Saturday, May 24, 2014

The Psychology of Writing: Villain Motivation and the CANE Model: A Guest Post by Casey Lynn Covel





I'm so sorry this post is late! I've been at MomoCon all this weekend, and it's been exhausting. Posts will be at their regular times next week I promise. My good friend Casey Lynn Covel who I met at the Florida Christian Writers Conference is guest posting this week! She is another aspiring writer. You can find her on Facebook, Tumblr, and her own blog Meek Geek. ^ ^ Thank you, Casey!



A good, solid villain can make a story soar. But a simplified, clichéd villain merely fills an otherwise empty hole in the plot.

One of the keys to crafting a well-rounded villain is to give them a proper motivation for doing what they do. Let’s face it: we’ve heard the “conquer the entire world” and “destroy the planet” and “fill the land with darkness” motives a hundred times. And while these goals are totally workable for a villain, they feel empty unless there’s a genuinely believable drive behind them.

So, today let’s take a look at properly motivating your villain from a psychological perspective. We’ll be using the CANE model as a sort of checklist as we do so. If you’re not familiar with the CANE model, that’s alright. We’ll discuss it as we go.

The CANE model has five steps: efficacy, agency, affect, task value, and choice/persistence. All five of these criteria must be met in some way. Otherwise, the villain’s motivation will, realistically, disappear. Fulfilling all five requirements provides a more believable schema for your antagonist.

1.) Efficacy: Is your Villain able to accomplish the goal? -The absolute first question you need to ask yourself is this: “Is my villain personally able to do what he/she wants to do?” 

Let’s look at the “conquer the earth” cliché, for instance. If your villain wants to take over the world, does he/she have the means to do it? Are they a genius mastermind with an IQ of 300, capable of influencing the world through mind-altering gamma rays? Maybe they can’t do much physically, but they have the technical prowess to create an army of cyborgs to do their bidding.

 If your villain constantly makes threats about conquering the planet (or the universe or the galaxy or whatever it is that they’re after) then readers should feel that the villain is worthy of his/her claim. A villain who plans to govern the world with an army of alien invaders, but can’t even create a translator in order to speak to them, might be lacking in the credibility department. Unless your villain doubles as your satirical comedy relief, make certain that you give them the brains, brawn, skills, or capabilities to act out their goals. Motivation dies if this can’t be achieved.

This is one reason why you hear writers stressing the fact that you should make your villain just as strong as your hero (if not stronger). Readers must believe that the villain is more than capable of achieving their goal, whether that be through resources, mental prowess, physical strength, magical powers, an army of servants, or something else. The key word here is able. Is your villain personally able to achieve the goal that they want?

2. Agency: Is anything preventing the villain from accomplishing the goal? - I know what you’re thinking, “Of course something’s preventing the villain from accomplishing the goal! It’s called ‘the hero’!”

Well, pardon the cliché, but “hold your horses” for a second. You’re right, the hero should be the villain’s greatest opposition, but that’s not quite what agency means here.

While efficacy is an internal barrier, agency is an external one. The villain must feel that they are “allowed” to pursue the goal. Of course, most villains don’t play along with the laws and rules that govern everyone else, so it’s unlikely that they’ll wait for permission to do what they want. What’s more likely to destroy their goal is an external circumstance that neither they, nor anyone else, can control.

For example, if the villain seeks a great power hidden in the depths of an underground city, but the air in that location is poisonous and impassable, then the villain is more likely to not pursue that goal. Of course, if the villain believes that they can create something (like a special breathing apparatus) to survive the toxin, then the motivation won’t die. But if (for example’s sake) there is absolutely no way to survive the toxin, then the villain is most likely going to forget about that particular goal and choose another, more attainable one.

Another common external factor is time. Does the villain have enough time to accomplish their goal? Can the villain really collect all seven pieces of the shattered artifact in three days? Can the immortality elixir be produced before the lunar eclipse occurs? And so on. Time is one of the greatest external factors that can shatter a villain’s motivation.

External factors can be anything outside of the villain’s person that directly hinders his or her goals. Examples of external factors are: weather, legal laws/rules, resources, individuals in higher power, universal laws (gravity, inertia, etc.), time, and nature.

3. Affect: How does the Villain Feel about the Goal? - There are two factors that emotionally affect the villain’s goal—emotions and moods.

Moods are long-term feelings that stay with the villain over time. A lot of this has to do with the villain’s personality. A royal antagonist, for example, may have a continuous mood of superiority and a “higher-than-thou” attitude. Their goals will reflect their personal feelings. Whatever they are out to achieve will tie in to their feelings. Attacking and conquering a neighboring kingdom, in this instance, would be directly influenced by the mood of superiority.

Revenge is heavily influenced by mood. The antagonist feels a certain way towards a character (bitter, humiliated, wronged, etc.) and their mood remains constant towards that character. This provides a stable mentality for the villain to operate from. The mood towards the goal should stay the same. If the villain “doesn’t feel like it” then they aren’t going to go through with it.

Emotions, on the other hand, are quick, fleeting, and triggered by specific events. These are more likely to motivate a villain for a short-term goal, or perhaps a smaller goal on the way to their grand one. Traditional “mad scientist” and “insane” villain types are heavily swayed by emotions, rather than moods. They act on fleeting emotions triggered by small, random events. This makes them unpredictable and unstable. Without a long-term mood to guide them, these villain types sometimes lack a believable, solid motivation.

4. Task Value: How is the goal Important to the Villain? - This is the key to establishing a strong motivation—particularly in a villain. How is the ultimate goal important to who the villain is? How does accomplishing the goal benefit the villain and his/her self-image?

Villains have selfish goals; therefore, the goals will ultimately be self-serving in some way (even when they’re disguised as a benevolent cause). More importantly, these goals must fulfill some aspect of the villain’s self-image—how they view themselves and how they want others to view them (powerful, religious, god-like, honorable, malicious, a savior, a mighty warrior, an undisputed monarch, a rebel, etc.).

 In The Legend of Korra, for example, Amon (the antagonist) seeks to rid the world of bending and put all citizens on “equal grounds.” He blames bending for all the world’s wrongs—starting wars, causing unbalance, and forcing those without bending abilities into a position of societal disadvantage.

At first glance, this appears to be a benevolent cause, but take a deeper look and you’ll find that Amon’s motivation is almost completely self-serving. He blames bending, and the Avatar (bending master), for all of the wrongs that have happened in his life (ruining his father, among other thing). As a result, he seeks revenge in order to fulfill a part of who he is to the world—an avenger to the benders and a savior to the world of non-bending. Ultimately, Amon turns to violent and malicious methods in order to accomplish his goals.

To a villain, a goal should have two purposes: (1) to gain something that the villain wants and (2) to fulfill some part of the villain’s self-image. Villains should never do things simply “because they’re evil.” They should have something significant to gain from their actions—both materially and individually.

5. Choice/Persistence: Will the Villain continue to pursue the same Goal, even when given other Options? - The final ingredients to motivation are persistence and choice. Does the villain continue to pursue the same goal, through the same antagonistic means, even when other options are presented to him/her?

If the answer is “yes,” then the villain is highly motivated and unlikely to waver.

A great example of this is Loki from the MARVEL films. After being unknowingly adopted by Odin, ruler of Asgard, Loki seeks the throne, even though he knows his older brother Thor is entitled to it. Loki’s goal is to become king of Asgard (and wherever else he might rule), and he lets nothing dissuade him from that goal.

Loki engages in open treason, using violent means towards gaining the throne. Even so, his brother Thor offers him several chances to return to Asgard and be forgiven. Loki pretends to accept Thor’s offers, but only when they further his own goals. He never repents of his wrongs and lets nothing move him away from his ultimate goal. Loki’s motivation is solid. He consistently chooses to continue pursuing the throne, even when given other alternatives.

Villains have strong motivations when they continue to make the same choice about a goal, even when given other options towards reaching that goal (such as in Loki’s case).

A Final Note about Motivation

When designing your villain’s motivation and ultimate goal, keep the following questions in mind:
·         Is my villain personally capable of pursuing the goal? Does he/she have the physical/mental capabilities and/or resources required?
·         Is my villain “allowed” to pursue their goal? Are there any external factors that would realistically put an end to his/her goal (weather, resources, time, rules/laws, physics, nature, other individuals of high power, etc.)?
·         What is my villain’s over-all mood toward the goal? How does this mood tie into the goal itself?
·         How is the goal important to the villain? Ask yourself the two most important questions: (1) what does the villain get out of the goal and (2) how does achieving the goal fulfill or enhance the villain’s self-image?
·         Will the villain continue to pursue the same goal, even when given other options towards achieving that goal?

Remember, it’s not enough to have a villain continuously pursue a goal blindly, just to fulfill the “continue to pursue” requirement. All five criteria must be met. Otherwise, readers are likely to tap into the fact that something seems unrealistic or “off” about your villain’s motivation and goals. Focus especially on the “importance to the villain” factor when developing motivation, but don’t overlook the other requirements. They are the smaller building blocks that uphold the larger structure of “importance.”


What is your villains goal? Is he capable of pursuing it? Is he allowed to pursue it? How does he feel about it? Is it important to him? Will he see it through to the end?


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Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Zephyr




It's Wonderful Word Wednesday again and here is an old favorite word of mine. ^ ^

zephyr
noun
1.) a gentle, mild breeze.
2.) (initial capital letter) Literary. the west wind.
3.) any of various things of fine, light quality, as fabric, yarn, etc.

Example Sentence: A zephyr blew through Elasa's glittering, golden hair.

Elasa (Starbloods) is the blonde on right.
Have you seen or used this word before? What do you think of it?

If you liked this post, come back every Saturday for more writing advice, character interviews, book reviews and more! On Sundays I have Soundtrack Sundays where I post a new score piece, Tuesdays are Tea Tuesdays with tea reviews, Wednesdays I have Wonderful Word Wednesdays where I post a new vocabulary word, and Fridays are Fan Fridays where I post tags and other goodies. To help support my dream to be an author follow this blog, like me on Facebook, watch me on deviantART, and follow me on Pinterest and Twitter. If you want to know more about my books check out them out here. Thank you! :)



Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Tea Tuesday: Dragon Eye Oolong




I'm not really a coffee person. I prefer tea, and I know a lot of fellow writers love tea, too. But have you ever wanted to break out of the Early Grey or English Breakfast norm and try something new? Well, let me help you find some cool new teas! If you need a little hot and flavorful boost to help you reach your writing goal or you're just a lover of tea or you'd like to try some tea but aren't fond of the stereotypical types, these Tea Tuesday posts are for you.

This weeks tea is ... 

*drum roll*

Dragon Eye Oolong



How I found it: A friend of mine found this tea at a Circle K gas station and insisted I try it the next time I came to see her. When I finally got to her house and smelled the tea bag for the first time, my first though was "It smells like a dragon." If somehow I ever pictured how a dragon would smell this is how this tea tastes if that makes sense lol. Next thing I know, both of us are loading up on this tea the next time we go to the Circle K gas station.

The Tea: Like I said this tea smells like a dragon. No, I'll be a little more descriptive. This is a light, sweet tea with a slight smokey taste hence dragon. ;) It's a mixture of black and green tea with peach, safflower and apricot tastes which make this lovely soothing taste.

Serving Recommendations: I steep this tea for three or four minutes and take it with sugar only.

How much is it and where can you get it? This is a slightly expensive tea and a bit hard to find. It is currently out of stock on the Revolution Tea website and expensive on Amazon, but I also found it on the Vitamin Shoppe website for a cheaper price. And hey check some of your local Circle K gas stations. You may get lucky. ;) It was about a dollar per tea bag there.

So how good is it? Because of this teas unusual taste and limited availability, I don't drink it too often, but I still love the flavor. Four stars!


Have you tried this tea? What did you think of it?

If you liked this post, come back every Saturday for more writing advice, character interviews, book reviews and more! On Sundays I have Soundtrack Sundays where I post a new score piece, Tuesdays are Tea Tuesdays with tea reviews, Wednesdays I have Wonderful Word Wednesdays where I post a new vocabulary word, and Fridays are Fan Fridays where I post tags and other goodies. To help support my dream to be an author follow this blog, like me on Facebook, watch me on deviantART, and follow me on Pinterest and Twitter. If you want to know more about my books check out them out here. Thank you! :)


Sunday, May 18, 2014

Soundtrack Sunday: Main Theme (Cognition)




It's Soundtrack Sunday again! This is a piece from a really cool Indie speculative thriller. The game had awesome writing and it is so creepy lol. The music caught my attention too. I got the soundtrack free because I backed the game. This piece is really haunting, and I love the male vocals. Check out more cool tracks from my Soundtrack Sundays YouTube playlist. ^ ^


Have you heard this piece before? What do you think of it? Have you played Cognition: An Erica Reed Thriller?

If you liked this post, come back every Saturday for more writing advice, character interviews, book reviews and more! On Sundays I have Soundtrack Sundays where I post a new score piece, Tuesdays are Tea Tuesdays with tea reviews, Wednesdays I have Wonderful Word Wednesdays where I post a new vocabulary word, and Fridays are Fan Fridays where I post tags and other goodies. To help support my dream to be an author follow this blog, like me on Facebook, watch me on deviantART, and follow me on Pinterest and Twitter. If you want to know more about my books check out them out here. Thank you! :)


Saturday, May 17, 2014

Interview with Mor (Red Hood)



Mor (Red Hood)

Me:
Hello again! I'm back with another character interview. Today's is with the main character of my steampunk fantasy retelling of Little Red Riding Hood called Red Hood. Thank you to everyone who contributed questions! If you'd like to get to know Mor a bit before the interview you can check out her bio. *smiles* Now let's get this started. *turns in chair to Mor* Hey, Mor.

Mor:
*sits in a chair across from me, has an English accent* Hello, Tori.

Me:
Are you ready to answer some questions? You have a lot here.

Mor:
Let's get to it.

Me:
Okay. Jedi Kyra_117 has several questions for you. Question one: Mor, you use pistols and axes according to your bio, but do you have any other weapons you like or would like to learn how to wield?

Mor:
I can also use knives and rifles, but I just prefer my axes and pistols.

Me:
*nods* Question two: What's your favorite dish?

Mor:
I like roast goose and mince pies, but I can't get enough of tarts. Black currant, raspberry ... Any tart I will eat it.

Me:
I like them too. And Jedi Kyra's last question: And one more; what are you most looking forward to about becoming a Red Hood?

Mor: 
It's a tie between the travel and no more lessons to be frank. *laughs a little*

Me:
I see. Sahara Moran has two questions for you. The first one is: Mor, is there anything other than werewolf hunting that you would do?

Mor:
No, I can't really imagine doing anything else. This is what I was born to do.

Me:
And question two: How would you live your life if the werewolves were destroyed for good?

Mor: 
I haven't thought about it much. Join the military perhaps. *shrugs*

Me:
*nods* Emily Lynne asks: Okay, here's a question: What does she (you, Mor) like to do with her friends?

Mor: 
Well, there's horseback riding, walks, Dina makes me try on her dresses she makes *rolls eyes*, Claes likes to show me his new silverworks, ehm ... There's more but I that's just some things we do.

Me:
*nods* Maddie Jay has three questions for you. Question one: Is there any special someone in your life?

Mor: 
I don't have the time for anyone like that, and if I did I'm not sure I would divulge that publicly. *shifts in her chair*

Me:
Question two: Is there anything about werewolf hunting that you DON'T like?

Mor:
Anything that involves waiting too long, and having a mission compromised due to stupid moves from incompetent team members.

Me:
And her last one: Do you think there's any chance you might still find your father?

Mor:
I'm going to skip that one. *clears throat* I'd prefer that topic wasn't brushed upon. 

Me:
*nods* Noted. Anonymous asks: What do you prefer to hunt with? Rifles or bow?

Mor:
Rifles. No doubt.

Me:
*smiles* Casey Covel has three questions for you. Question one: How did you get your wolfhound, Sielgair?

Mor:
We breed wolfhounds at the manor so I picked him out from a litter when he was a pup.

Me:
Question two: What's the most special about the bond between you and your wolfhound?

Mor:
When a Red Hood in training picks out her wolfhound at eight years old she alone is responsible for it. She trains it and takes care of all its needs. It teaches us responsibility and compassion for life.

Me:
And the last question: How does he (Sielgair) help you on your missions?

Mor:
The wolfhounds are an essential part of missions. They help in tracking and combat. 

Me:
Cool. Shelli Grace asks: When did Mor decide she wanted to be a huntress like her mother and granny?

Mor:
It wasn't a choice. I'm a Silver Sister. All Silver Sisters become Red Hoods if we like it or not. It's our duty. How many more of these do we have?

Me: 
Four.

Mor: 
*nods* I need to feed Sielgair soon.

Me:
It won't be much longer. Maggie has two questions. Her first is: Mor, what is your favorite part about living at the Red Hood Manor?

Mor: 
I suppose the sisterhood. Everyone is a Silver Sister there with the exception of the servants.

Me:
And Maggie's second question: How did you meet Claes and Dina?

Mor:
Dina I've known all my life. Our mothers are friends so we grew up together. Claes ... *inhales* That's a longer tale perhaps for another time.

Me:
Alyssa Greer asks: What is your earliest memory?

Mor: 
Playing in the snow with Dina. We use to throw snowballs in each other's faces. *laughs a little*

Me:
And last question from Ruth Blomgren: Mor, how would you describe your upbringing?

Mor:
Good. I love my family and friends and where I live. That was the last one right?

Me:
Yes.

Mor: 
Well, that was fun.

Me:
Good. Thank for you coming, Mor.

Mor:
You're welcome. I'm glad I've finally gotten to do one of these. It's about time.

Me:
Yeah. Thank you everyone again for the great questions! If you have any more post them in the comments and they can feature in another interview. If you'd like to learn more about Red Hoods check out the book's Pinterest board. Thanks for reading!


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If you liked this post, come back every Saturday for more writing advice, character interviews, book reviews and more! On Sundays I have Soundtrack Sundays where I post a new score piece, Tuesdays are Tea Tuesdays with tea reviews, Wednesdays I have Wonderful Word Wednesdays where I post a new vocabulary word, and Fridays are Fan Fridays where I post tags and other goodies. To help support my dream to be an author follow this blog, like me on Facebook, watch me on deviantART, and follow me on Pinterest and Twitter. If you want to know more about my books check out them out here. Thank you! :)


Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Grabble




It's Wonderful Word Wednesday again and here is a useful word. :)
grabble
verb
1.) to feel or search with the hands, grope.
2.) to sprawl; scramble.

Example Sentence: Matt grabbled the wall, searching for the hidden switch to get Ashlyn out.



Have you seen or used this word before? What do you think of it?

If you liked this post, come back every Saturday for more writing advice, character interviews, book reviews and more! On Sundays I have Soundtrack Sundays where I post a new score piece, Tuesdays are Tea Tuesdays with tea reviews, Wednesdays I have Wonderful Word Wednesdays where I post a new vocabulary word, and Fridays are Fan Fridays where I post tags and other goodies. To help support my dream to be an author follow this blog, like me on Facebook, watch me on deviantART, and follow me on Pinterest and Twitter. If you want to know more about my books check out them out here. Thank you! :)